Deer Hunting the Old Way

Today rifles and shotguns are the more prominent way when it comes to hunting deer and other animals, consider the earlier settlers, where instead of a blunderbuss, the best way was using a bow.

Bow hunting is another way when it comes to hunting deer. Meant for the dexterous, bow hunting is a more delicate science and not just a sport, where the hunter must determine what sort of bow would be comfortable to use. This is nothing like Robin Hood and his longbows, I mean those were the only bows back then aside from crossbows. The difference here is to know where your draw length is, or the distance and strength on pulling the bow.

Several bow types like compound, stick types (the English longbows) or something like Rambo would use as long as there are no explosive heads. Never mind the brand for now since a lot of manufacturers have been making some of the best bows out there for hunting. And if a beginning bow hunter thinks it’s all about shooting arrows, guess again. Since most modern bows can be tuned according to the weight of drawing, it would be beneficial for those with weak arms or probably of advancing age. Just because a strong or heavy bow will kill just about anything, guess again. There’s science involved to know if the arrow’s trajectory is as flat as possible depending on the weight of the draw. For instance, killing a whitetail deer with an 80 lb. draw has a high risk of failure or the arrow falling off the rest comparing with a 60 lb. draw. Accuracy is the key when it comes to archery, and a sturdy and easy-to-use bow is the ticket for the perfect kill.

There are other things to consider, like what sort of shaft can be used. Similar to using a certain ammunition for a rifle, arrows can either be the cedar, aluminum, or carbon. Aluminum shafts are sturdy, lighter and much cheaper than carbon, and the best ammo to use for the hunt. In fact, it doesn’t stop there. Fletching or plastic type vanes are an integral part to make sure that any arrow shot will be flat and swift. Depending on the condition and user, vanes won’t be affected by cold or wet conditions in comparison to feathers, while the feathers offer a quieter shot once released.

It takes practice and being comfortable with a bow to hunt the old fashioned way, and it makes no difference if the person lives a modern lifestyle or deep into the woods.