Times Change, Turkey Hunting Basics Stay the Same

One of the most popular quarries for hunters is the wild turkey. Turkey hunting takes place in both the spring and the fall. This gives a nice opportunity for hunters that miss out on one season to make it up with the other. During the spring when turkeys have their mating season, many hunters go out at the break of day and use calls to lure out male gobblers. As many hunters know, no two hunts will ever be the same. While some hunts end almost as soon as they begin, others can make a hunter why he or she ever took up turkey hunting in the first place.

Scouting for turkeys is the first step for planning the successful hunt. Finding these habitats locally can be as easy as asking a neighbor or in some cases, whoever is working the counter of the hunting department in a sporting goods store. Those well versed in turkey hunting will venture out at dawn to areas where turkey have been seen and listen for gobbling. It is perfectly fine to use a turkey call so long as, upon getting a response from a gobbler, one does not respond in kind. It does not take much for turkeys to become wary and stop gobbling or move out of an area altogether. Too much gobbling in a single area can have quite a negative effect.

Because there are two turkey seasons, hunters are often urged to somewhat change turkey hunting tactics between the spring and fall. In the early season, males are looking to mate with as many females as possible, making them more than willing to investigate a hunter’s calls. In the late season when much of the mating has already occurred, things can be a little more difficult but not impossible. Instead of mating calls, many hunters change their calling technique to concur with a turkey’s gobbling style. Aggressive calls should be answered with aggressive calls, while soft calls should be answered correspondingly.

Another tactic to make things easier is to hunt in teams. An extra person can be key to a successful hunt. For example, when a hunter sets ups a certain number of yards behind a partner, he or she can then call a gobbler right into the other hunter’s line of sight. The result is usually a successful kill. When it comes to turkey hunting, there are a vast number of tips, tricks and advice for getting results. As with many other things, what works for one hunter does not always work for another. However, sticking with the basics has always been a good rule of thumb when it comes to turkey hunting.